History of the Königin Victoriaberg vineyard

We owe this majestic name to the English queen’s love of Rheingau wines.

When Her Majesty Queen Victoria and her German husband Prince Albert travelled to Hochheim to uncover the mystery of the so-called German "Hock’s" excellence in 1845, the winery-owner Georg Michael Papstmann invited the royal couple to his estate. As the vineyard had been certified by the local town council as one of the "best and most beautiful vineyard sites in Hochheim", Papstmann had high hopes that the royal couple would accept.

A new tradition arose out of this honourable visit, as in 1850 Mr. Papstmann was granted permission to name the vineyard "Königin Victoriaberg", after her Royal Highness.

On May 24th 1854, Queen Victoria’s 35th birthday, Georg Papstmann proudly unveiled the New Gothic style monument dedicated to Queen Victoria, which he had erected at the heart of his vineyard. Today the monument and the traditional wine label herald this important event in wine history. Incidentally, this unique location is an excellent place to hold wine-tastings and special events.


…and the Hupfeld family story

The Hupfeld family tradition in wine began in 1907, when Henner Hupfeld purchased a winery in Mittelheim, a small village in the Rheingau and today a part of the town Oestrich-Winkel. His family owned and operated a haulage company, which quickly distributed Henner’s wines even beyond the German borders to Holland and East Prussia. Henner’s son, Arndt-Richard Hupfeld, acquired additional vineyards, almost doubling the size of the winery to 5.5 hectares (13.5 acres), and expanded the estate cellar considerably.The Königin Victoriaberg vineyards, which had passed into the hands of the Neus winery in 1917, joined with the Hupfeld estate when Arndt-Richard asked Irmgard Neus for her hand in marriage. After settling into a well-earned retirement in 1990, their eldest son Henning Hupfeld, together with his wife Hiltrud, assumed management of the Hochheim winery.